ICFM/26-99/PIL/D

 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

“SoliDARITY WITH THE GREAT SOCIAliST PEOPLE’S liBYAN ARAB JAMAHIRIYA IN RESPECT OF THE SO-CALLED D’AMATO LAW”

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU – BURKINA FASO, 28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

The US Congress passed the so called D’amato Law named after the Republic Senator Al Faulsi D’Amato from New York who adopted the draft of this law on 16.7.1996. This law took effect upon its signing by US President Bill Clinton on 5.8.1996.

2. Under this law, the USA imposed sanctions on foreign companies which deal with libya or Iran in the field of oil and natural gas and which have investments exceeding US$ 40 million in one year. The sanctions provided for this law are not only limited to the companies and institutions working in the field of oil, but they also cover the companies and institutions which in the view of the American Administration, have violated Security Council Resolutions No. 748 and 883.

3. The sanctions provided for in the D’Amato law cover seven different categories:

  1. Have bank facilities from the American Import Export Bank.
  2. Have license of exportation to the USA.
  3. Have loans of financial appropriations exceeding US$ 10,000,000 in one year from American Banking Institutions.
  4. Be selected as an agent in dealing with the debts of the US Government.
  5. Act as an intermediary for the USA or a depositor for the funds of the US Government.
  6. Be given the chance to undertake American Government purchases. In addition to that:
  7. An embargo will be imposed on some or all the company’s imports to the USA.

4. The said American law was received with full international disapproval both at formal or other levels. It caused strong critics to the US policy particular in Western Europe all the States of which rejected and defied it. They have addressed strong warning to take counter measures against American companies. It was also met with strong disapproval and condemnation by third World States. The latter considered it as a direct threat to the stability of their economic future.

5. At the Islamic level, Islamic Conferences expressed in relevant resolutions their discontent and rejection of this law and any other unilateral arbitrary measures, whether political or legal, from one country against another.

6. The Eighth Islamic Summit Conference held in Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran in December 1977 and Twenty-fifth ICFM held in Doha, State of Qatar, considered this issue. It underlined the importance of the relevant Islamic resolutions and adopted resolution No. 15/8-P(IS) in this respect in which it expressed solidarity with the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Great Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya with their positions against the so-called D’Amato Law. The Conference also rejected any arbitrary, extra-territorial and unilateral measures whether political or legal applied by one country against another one and urged all States to consider the so-called D’Amato Law which is against the international law and norms, as null and void. It reiterated its support to the positions of the two Islamic countries in the face of this unjust law in international and regional fora.

7. The Secretary General underlines the importance of the follow-up by member States of their rejection of this unilateral measure by a strong super power against Third World countries and in particular against two Islamic OIC Members. At the same time, the Secretary General stresses the importance of further drawing the attention of the international community to such unilateral measures. He calls on the international community, and in particular the European States, to continue rejecting the so called D’Amato law as it does not harm only the targeted States, but also the interests of the industrial States and their large scale companies which have huge activities and investments in most of the developing countries.

8. The Secretary General feels that this unjust law will impede the development and investments plans in Iran and libya and will have a tremendous adverse effect on the economic stability of the two countries in the long run, and that they will have a direct effect on the infrastructures therein. They also aggravate the burden of hardships experienced by the libyan people as a result of the sanctions that have been imposed on the Great Jamahiriya several years ago.

10. The Secretary General submits this report to the Twenty-Sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for appropriate decision.

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