REPORT

REPORTS OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

LEGAL AFFAIRS

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

International Islamic Court of Justice

Follow-up of the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam

Coordination among the Member-States in the Field of Human Rights

The Signing/Ratification of (Accession to) the Agreements Concluded in the Framework of the OIC

Convening of a United Nations Conference to Define Terrorism and Distinguish it from Peoples’ Struggle for National liberation

Follow-up of the Code of Conduct for Combating International Terrorism

Strengthening of Islamic Solidarity in Combating Hijacking

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

THE INTERNATIONAL ISLAMIC COURT OF JUSTICE

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

1. The Fifth Islamic Summit held in Kuwait in January 1987 adopted the proposal submitted by the State of Kuwait to the Third Islamic Summit held in Makkah Al-Mukarramah in 1981 on the establishment of an International Islamic Court of Justice which would decide on disputes arising among OIC Member States. The Resolution of the Fifth Islamic Summit 13/5-P on the Establishment of the Court included operative paragraphs which stipulate the following:

(a) The Conference approved the Draft Statute of the International Islamic Court of Justice on the basis of voluntary jurisdiction (i.e. its consideration of disputes, by the Court, and decision thereon is not mandatory but takes place when accepted by the States parties to the dispute namely by referring it to the Court).

(b) Decided to add a fourth paragraph (D) to Article three of the OIC Charter, considering the Court as the fourth main organ of the OIC, it states that:

”The International Islamic Court of Justice, exercising its functions according to its Statute annexed to this Charter, which forms a complementary part of the Charter.”

2. Thus this paragraph made the Court the fourth principal organ in the Organisation (together with the Summit, the Foreign Ministers Conference and the General Secretariat) and its Statute became an integral and complementary part of the Charter.

3. Underlining the importance of the establishment of the Court and the early commencement of its functions, the successive Islamic Conferences since the Seventeenth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers urged the Member States to ratify the Court’s Statute and the amendment of Article Three of the Charter, requested the Secretary General to undertake the necessary contacts in this regard and expressed their appreciation to the Member States which have already made the ratification.

4. As per Article Eleven of the Charter, two thirds of the Member States are required to make the ratification. However, the General Secretariat notes that only eight Member States have made the ratification so far, namely: the State of Kuwait, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, the Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya, the State of Bahrain, the State of Qatar, the Arab Republic of Egypt and the Republic of Maldives. Thus the required number of ratifications for the Court to commence its functions still awaits the ratification of 34 Member States being required.

5. The Secretary General hopes that the Twenty-sixth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers would consider this matter in order to take the necessary action to urge the Member States, which have not yet ratified the Court’s Statute and the amendment of Article Three of the Charter, to do so as soon as possible.

6. The Secretary General presents this report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for consideration and appropriate decision.

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REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

THE FolLOW-UP OF THE CAIRO DECLARATION ON HUMAN RIGHTS IN ISLAM

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

 

1. The Nineteenth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers, held in Cairo in 1990, approved the Document of “Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam”, and called on Member States to seek guidance from it in the field of human rights.

2. As the Declaration is limited to general principles in the fields related to human rights, there appears to be an imperative need to develop the provisions of the Declaration through continued efforts to strengthen cooperation in the various fields of human rights in the light of the guidelines contained in the Cairo Declaration.

3. The Eighth Session of the Islamic Summit Conference in its resolution 50/8-P(IS) and the Twenty-fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers in its resolution 50/25-P, recognized the utmost importance of the issue of human rights at the international level in general, and at the level of relations among OIC Member States in particular, considering current developments and interactions in international fora, and the direct implications of this matter on the speedy achievement of development, progress and stability in various economic, social and political fields. For those reasons, the resolution recognized the importance of following up the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam and decided to request the General Secretariat to convene a meeting of an open-ended Ad-Hoc Governmental Group to start elaborating Islamic standards and values and codifying them in comprehensively acknowledged Islamic Charters on human rights.

4. In order to realize the above, the General Secretariat will invite the Governmental Group to hold its Sixth Meeting to carry out the mandate entrusted to it in Resolution No. 50/25-P of the Twenty-fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers.

5. The Group of Experts held its Fifth Session at the Headquarters of the General Secretariat in Jeddah, from 17 to 19 October, 1998 which reached the recommendations contained in the report of the Group annexed to this report (Document IGEFCDHR/5-98/REP.1 FINAL).

6. The Secretary General presents this report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for consideration and appropriate decision.

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Report of the Fifth Meeting of the Intergovernmental Experts Group

On the Follow-up of the Cairo Declaration On Human Rights in Islam

Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

(17-19 October 1998)

 

 

1. The Intergovernmental Experts Group On the Follow-up of the Cairo Declaration On Human Rights in Islam held its Fifth meeting On 27-29 Jumadul II 1419H (17-19 October 1998) at the OIC General Secretariat Headquarters in Jeddah, in accordance with the provision of operative paragraph five of the resolution No. 50/8-P (IS) of the Eighth Islamic Summit Conference, and resolution 50/25-P adopted by the Twenty-fifth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers in order to finalize its task.

2. Government Experts from the following Member States participated in the Meeting:

  • Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
  • State of the United Arab Emirates
  • Republic of Indonesia
  • Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Islamic Republic of Pakistan
  • Brunei Darussalam
  • People’s Republic of Bangladesh
  • Republic of Turkey
  • Republic of Tunisia
  • Peoples Democratic Republic of Algeria
  • Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Republic of Senegal
  • Republic of Sudan
  • Syrian Arab Republic
  • Sultanate of Oman
  • Republic Guinea
  • State of Palestine
  • State of Kuwait
  • State of Qatar
  • Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya
  • Malaysia
  • Arab Republic of Egypt
  • Kingdom of Morocco
  • Federal Republic of Nigeria.

3. His Excellency Mr. Zuhair Mohammad Al-Idrissi, Head of Delegation of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was elected Chairman of the Meeting. The other members of the Bureau were elected as follows: Vice-Chairmen Kingdom of Morocco, State of Palestine, Rapporteur, Islamic Republic of Iran.

4. At the commencement of the meeting, His Excellency Dr. Azeddine Laraki, the OIC Secretary General, delivered his message to the meeting. He welcomed the participants and made a particular reference to the directions of the Eighth Islamic Summit Conference to widen the scope of the mission entrusted to the Group which were included in Resolution No. 50/8-P (IS) and confirmed by Resolution No. 50/25-P of the Twenty-fifth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers, wherein it called on the “Intergovernmental Experts Group On Following Up the Cairo Declaration On Human Rights in Islam, in accordance with its mandate and pursuant to the principles enshrined in the Cairo Declaration to start the formulation and consideration of Islamic covenants on human rights in meetings in preparation for recommending their submission to the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers”.

He pointed out that the most important human rights, in general, fall into two main categories: equality and freedom from which the other rights emanate. Modern democratic nations have claimed that the world is indebted to them for the establishment of these two rights. As a matter of fact, Islam was the first to establish the principles of human rights in the most comprehensive form and the widest scope. Islam has come as the seal of all divine messages and hence Almighty Allah blessed it with precepts to ensure a stable life for humanity and with a statement of rights established for every human being, in their minutest detail to rule out any doubt or controversy.

Muslims have benefited human civilization for nearly a thousand years but their arms were weakened to carry the torch at a time when other nations were proceeding to the forefront to occupy the vacant position. Then a time came when we saw the principles which we had exported to others being sent back to us packaged as a new human discovery as though we have never experienced before.

His Excellency stressed the high standing of human rights in the OIC Charter and the commitment of the Member States to observe and respect these rights pursuant to the precepts of Islam. This is what has been underscored by paragraph 4 of the Preamble of the Cairo Declaration On Human Rights in Islam.

His Excellency stated to the participants in the meeting that from this perspective the Cairo Declaration was launched. He highlighted the importance of the Islamic principles and precepts and their position in the field of human rights, and that it is high time to draw up the details of these principles and precepts. Our duty to seek guidance from them should change into an obligation to observe and respect them. This is the real meaning of the resolution of the Eighth Islamic Summit to charge the Group with elaborating and codifying these standards into Islamic instruments on human rights which are universally recognized.

5. The Chairman of the Meeting, H.E. Mr. Zuhair Al-Idrissi, delivered a speech welcoming the participants and hailed the Cairo Declaration On Human Rights which is based on the Islamic Sharia. He stressed that it should be the source for every Islamic State in the field of human rights. He pointed out that, Fourteen centuries ago, Islam recognized the legal personality of the individual; a personality free from discrimination on the basis of sex, race, religion or language. The document on human rights in Islam clearly stress this matter. The Chairman requested continuation of efforts to inform about human rights in Islam and propagate them as divine precepts and not as positivist laws.

Thereafter discussions focused on how to implement operative paragraph No.2 of Resolution No.50/8-P, adopted by the Eighth Islamic Summit Conference and Resolution No.50/25-P adopted by the Twenty -fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers which stipulated calling on the Intergovernmental Experts Group in accordance with its mandate and pursuant to the principles enshrined in the Cairo Declaration to start the formulation and codification of Islamic standards and values into Islamic Instruments on Human Rights which are to be universally recognized.

In view of the ramifications of the subjects related to the implementation of this paragraph the discussions resulted in the following:

FIRST: NATURE OF REQUIRED INSTRUMENTS

Two main approaches emerged from the discussions of the subject, as follows:-

a) The preparation of applicable instruments that may take the form of covenants. Each one should address in detail one subject or several subjects pursuant to the Islamic principles and values contained in the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam; this being understood from operative paragraph two(2) of the resolutions adopted by the Eight Session of the Islamic Summit Conference and the Twenty-fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers.

b) The other approach called for a document in the form of a declaration having a worldwide acceptance and is more detailed than the Cairo Declaration, even though it is based on it. Furthermore, the document should surpass the provisions of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in view of the universality of Islam regarding the various aspects of human life by addressing in detail, for example, the right in development and the right of self-determination, while stressing cultural particularities and their objective role in promoting human rights.

SECOND: liST OF SUBJECTS

Discussions in this regard resulted in several controls concerning drawing-up a list of subjects to begin with, namely:-

1. These subjects should be perceived from the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam.

2. Subjects are to be arranged according to their urgent priorities, for example, we may begin with economic and social rights, and their branching into rights of women and children as well as rights in development. The civil and political rights may be addressed later on, and so on …

 

THIRD: PREPARATION OF INSTRUMENTS:

Participants agreed that the Intergovernmental Expert Group has the competence to prepare these instruments. However, due to their specialized nature, the Group must charge an open-ended sub-committee of specialists in Islamic Sharia Sciences and law from within interested members of the Group to elaborate these instruments which are to be submitted to the Group for consideration and recommendation to the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

1. The Group stresses the reference to the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam, which is considered as the basis for the positions of Islamic States on Human Rights issues. It calls on these States to consult, and coordinate their stand in international fora on this basis.

2. The Group also recommends to continue publicizing the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam through publications, translation and distribution in the widest possible scope.

3. The Group emphasizes the necessity of holding the symposium already approved by the Eight Session of the Islamic Summit Conference and the Twenty-Fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers on informing about the Cairo Declaration on Human Rights in Islam which may be held in Geneva in conjunction with the convening of the Fifty-fifth Session of the UN Commission on Human Rights in 1999.

The Group recommends in this respect to thank the Islamic Solidarity Fund for allocating an amount of US$150,000.00 as a contribution towards holding the symposium.

4. As regards the nature of the required instruments, the Group recommends that it may be defined by the Twenty-Sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers, while taking into consideration the two mains approaches that emerged from the discussions.

5. The Group recommends also to define the list of subjects and their priorities according to the afore-mentioned provision of the report.

6. It recommends that an open-ended sub-committee of specialist in Islamic Sharia sciences and law from within interested members of the Group to elaborate these instruments which are to be submitted to the Group for consideration and recommendation to the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers.

At the close of the Meeting, the Group expressed thanks to His Excellency Dr. Azeddine Laraki, Secretary General of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, the General Secretariat and the Technical Secretariat. The Group also expressed appreciation to His Excellency the Chairman of the meeting for his good steering of the sessions.

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REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

COORDINATION AMONG THE MEMBER STATES IN THE FIELD OF HUMAN RIGHTS

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

1. The Eighth Session of the Islamic Summit Conference adopted Resolution 51/8-P(IS) on the Coordination Among Member States in the Field of Human Rights, where operative paragraphs invites the Member States to carry on consultation, coordination and cooperation among themselves in the field of human rights in international Conferences and meetings. Operative paragraph No.4 charges the Secretary General to designate Contact Groups to liaise with the concerned international or national organisations, particularly in New York and Geneva.

2. The Meeting of Coordination among the Islamic Foreign Ministers, held in 1995 in New York during the 53rd Session of the U.N. General Assembly, was an opportunity for Member States to coordinate their positions in the field of Human Rights. Similar coordination had been achieved during the 1996’s Session of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights in Geneva.

3. The OIC General Secretariat and the OIC Group in Geneva contributed towards preparing the symposium organized by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva, on 9 and 19 November 1998, titled (Enriching the Universality of Human Rights: Islamic Perspectives on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights”. A select group of specialists in Shariah and law participated in the symposium. It was agreed that the UNHCHR would finance the cost of printing and publishing the research papers presented by these scholars during the symposium.

4. The Ministerial Meeting of the OIC Contact Group on Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo, held in Geneva, on 7 April 1999 adopted a Declaration on the tragedy of the Kosovars who are facing ethnic cleansing by the Serbian government. The Declaration focused on exerting efforts towards, as well as approaching, parties concerned, such as the Serbian regime, NATO, European Union and Russia. Efforts must be made so that the UN Security Council may should its role in restoring peace and security in the region, so as to ensure peace and stability for Kosovars inside their homeland as well as to bring to justice perpetrators of crimes against the people of Kosovo.

The Declaration also focused on the necessity of preserving peace and stability in Bosnia-Herzegovina and establishing a group for coordinating humanitarian assistance to the people of Kosovo.

5. The Secretary General submits this report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for consideration and appropriate decision.

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REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

SIGNING/RATIFICATION OF, (ACCESSION TO,) THE AGREEMENTS CONCLUDED IN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

1- The General Secretariat continues to urge the Member States to accede to the various agreements concluded in the framework of the OIC so that the statutory quorum needed for those agreements to come into force – thereby consolidating the ties of cooperation among Member States – may be achieved. The aforesaid agreements are as follows:

A. GENERAL AGREEMENT ON ECONOMIC, TECHNICAL AND COMMERCIAL COOPERATION:

2- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (3), this Agreement has come into effect following ratification thereof by half the Member States of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference. So far (27) Member States have deposited their instruments of ratification with the General Secretariat. The number of Member States having signed the Agreement is thirteen. Attached is the list of States that have signed or ratified the Agreement.

 

B. AGREEMENT ON PROMOTION, PROTECTION AND GUARANTEE OF INVESTMENTS IN THE MEMBER STATES.

3- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (12), this Agreement came into force on 25.2.1988, three months after the deposit, by ten Member States, of their instruments of ratification with the General Secretariat. The number of Member States having deposited their instruments of ratification is eighteen (18). Attached is a list of those States.

C. STATUTE OF THE ISLAMIC CIVIL AVIATION COUNCIL:

4- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (20), this Statute will come into effect after its signing or ratification by ten (10) Member States. So far, only nine (9) Member States have signed the Statute, and four (4) have ratified it. Attached is a list of those States.

D. STATUTE OF THE ISLAMIC STATES TELECOMMUNICATIONS UNION:

5- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (15), this Statute will come into effect after its ratification by fifteen (15) Member States. So far, only nine (9) States have ratified the Statute and six (6) have signed it. Attached is a list of those States.

 

E. AGREEMENT ON THE IMMUNITIES AND PRIVILEGES OF THE ORGANISATION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE:

6- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (33), this Agreement shall come into force, in respect of each Member State, from the date of deposit, by the State concerned, of its instruments of accession to the Agreement with the General Secretariat.

So far, nineteen (19) Member States have ratified the Agreement. Attached is a list of their names. Therefore, the Agreement has come into force in those States in accordance with the provisions of the abovementioned article.

 

F. INTERNATIONAL ISLAMIC COURT OF JUSTICE:

7- As the Secretary General has indicated in his report to the Twenty-Fourth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers, the Fifth Islamic Summit Conference, by its Resolution 13/5-P (I.S.), approved the Draft Statute of the International Islamic Court of Justice. The Conference also approved the addition of Paragraph (d) to Article Three of the Charter. The text of the paragraph is as follows:

Also decides to add a fourth paragraph (Paragraph D), to Article Three of the OIC Charter, to read as follows: (The International Islamic Court of Justice). It shall exercise its functions in accordance with its Statute which is annexed to this Charter and forms an integral part thereof”.

8- The resolution called upon Member States to ratify the Statute of the Court and Article Three of the Charter, as amended, and expedite the deposit of their instruments of ratification with the General Secretariat.

9- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (49), the Court’s Statute, shall enter into force after the deposit, by two-thirds of the Member States, of their instruments of ratification with the General Secretariat. So far, only eight (8) Member States have ratified the Statute. These are: State of Kuwait; Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan; Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya; State of Bahrain; State of Qatar; Arab Republic of Egypt and Republic of Maldives.

G. ISLAMIC COMMITTEE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRESCENT:

10- In accordance with the provisions of its Article (21), the Agreement establishing this Committee shall enter into force after deposit of the instruments of ratification by two-thirds of the OIC Member States. So far, Seven (7) States have signed the Agreement, while only (4) have ratified it (see attached list).

H. FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT ON THE SYSTEM OF TRADE PREFERENCES AMONG MEMBER STATES:

11- In accordance with the provisions of its Article 183-1, this Agreement shall come into force as of the date of deposit, by Ten (10) OIC Member States, of their instruments of ratification with the Secretary General. As to the schedules of trade preferences to be drawn up through negotiations, they shall come into force after deposit, by Ten (10) contracting States, of their instruments of ratification with the OIC Secretary General, in accordance with Article 18/3-2 of the Agreement.

12- The attached list shows that Twenty (20) States have signed the Agreement and that the General Secretariat has received the instruments of ratification of only Six (6) of them.

13- The foregoing summary shows that most of the agreements concluded in the framework of the Organization of the Islamic Conference are faced with problems as to their coming into force due to the unavailability of the statutory quorum of ratifications required.

14- The Secretary General therefore hopes that the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers will adopt appropriate resolutions urging Member States to sign or ratify those agreements so as to speed up their coming into force. Attached are separate lists showing the status of signature/ratification (accession) of each Agreement.

15. The Secretary General submits this report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for consideration and appropriate decision.

 

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A. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE RATIFIED THE GENERAL AGREEMENT ON ECONOMIC, TECHNICAL AND COMMERCIAL COOPERATION

1. State of Bahrain

2. People’s Republic of Bangladesh

3. Republic of Cameroun

4. Islamic Federal Republic of the Comoros

5. Arab Republic of Egypt

6. State of the United Arab Emirates

7. Republic of Guinea

8. Republic of Indonesia

9. Republic of Iraq

10. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

11. State of Kuwait

12. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya

13. Malaysia

14. Republic of Mali

15. Kingdom of Morocco

16. Islamic Republic of Mauritania

17. Republic of Niger

18. Sultanate of Oman

19. Islamic Republic of Pakistan

20. State of Palestine

21. State of Qatar

22. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

23. Republic of Senegal

24. Syrian Arab Republic

25. Republic of Tunisia

26. Republic of Turkey

27.Islamic Republic of Iran

P.S. The above states have also signed the agreement.

 

B. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE ONLY SIGNED THE GENERAL AGREEMENT ON ECONOMIC, TECHNICAL AND COMMERCIAL COOPERATION

 

1. People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria

2. Burkina Faso

3. Republic of Djibouti

4. Republic of Gabon

5. Republic of the Gambia

6. Republic of the Maldives

7. Republic of Somalia

8. Republic of Uganda

9. Republic of Sudan

10. Republic of Chad

11. Republic of Yemen.

12. People’s Republic of Bangladesh

13. Republic of Tajikistan.

 

C. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE RATIFIED THE AGREEMENT ON PROMOTION, PROTECTION AND GUARANTEE OF INVESTMENTS

 

1. Arab Republic of Egypt

2. Republic of Indonesia

3. State of Kuwait

4. Republic of Mali

5. Republic of Uganda

6. Islamic Republic of Pakistan

7. State of Palestine

8. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

9. Republic of Somalia

10. Republic of Tunisia

11. Republic of Turkey

12. State of the United Arab Emirates

13. Islamic Republic of Iran.

14 Republic of Burkina Faso

15. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya

16. Kingdom of Morocco

17. Sultanate of Oman

18. Republic of Senegal

 

D. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE ONLY SIGNED THE AGREEMENT ON PROMOTION, PROTECTION AND GUARANTEE OF INVESTMENTS.

 

1. Republic of Djibouti

2. Malaysia

3. Republic of Sudan

4. Republic of Yemen

5. Republic of Cameroun

6. Republic of The Gambia

7. Republic of Guinea

8. Republic of Tajikistan.

 

E-1. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE RATIFIED THE STATUTE OF THE ISLAMIC STATES TELECOMMUNICATIONS UNION:

 

1. People’s Republic of Bangladesh

2. Arab Republic of Egypt

3. Islamic Republic of Pakistan

4. State of Palestine

5. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya

6. Republic of Senegal

7. State of the United Arab Emirates

8. Islamic Republic of Iran

9. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

 

E-2. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE ONLY SIGNED THE STATUTE OF THE ISLAMIC STATES TELECOMMUNICATION UNION.

 

1. Republic of The Gambia 2. Republic of Guinea

3. Kingdom of Morocco 4. Republic of Tunisia

5. Republic of Sudan 6. Republic of Yemen

F-1. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE RATIFIED THE STATUTE OF THE ISLAMIC CIVIL AVIATION COUNCIL:

1. Republic of Senegal

2. Republic of Tunisia

3. State of the United Arab Emirates

4. Islamic Republic of Pakistan

 

F-2. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE SIGNED THE STATUTE OF THE ISLAMIC CIVIL AVIATION COUNCIL

 

1. People’s Republic of Bangladesh

2. Republic of Niger

3. State of Palestine

4. Republic of The Gambia

5. Republic of Guinea

6. Islamic Republic of Iran

7. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

8. Republic of Sudan

9. Republic of Yemen

 

G. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE RATIFIED THE AGREEMENT ON PRIVILEGES AND IMMUNITIES:

 

1. Republic of Mali

2. Republic of Guinea

3. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

4. Sultanate of Oman

5. Islamic Republic of Pakistan

6. State of Kuwait

7. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya

8. Republic of Somalia

9. Republic of Tunisia

10. Arab Republic of Egypt

11. State of the United Arab Emirates

12. Republic of Senegal.

13. Republic of Iraq

14. Kingdom of Morocco

15. Islamic Republic of Iran

16. State of Qatar

17. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

18. State of Palestine

19. Republic of Yemen.

 

H. liST OF MEMBER STATES WHICH HAVE SIGNED/RATIFIED (ACCEDED TO) THE ISLAMIC COMMITTEE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRESCENT.

 

1. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya

2. Republic of Iraq

3. Republic of Mali

4. Kingdom of Morocco

5. Republic of Guinea

6. Republic of Turkey

7. Republic of Sudan

8. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

9. Islamic Republic of Iran

10. Republic of Tunisia

11. Syrian Arab Republic.

 

I. liST OF STATES WHICH HAVE SIGNED THE FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT ON THE SYSTEM OF TRADE PREFERENCES AMONG OIC MEMBER STATES:

 

1. Republic of Tunisia

2. State of Palestine

3. Republic of Guinea

4. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

5. Republic of Indonesia

6. Republic of Sudan

7. Republic of Chad.

8. Republic of Burkina Faso

9. Republic of Cameroun

10.Republic of The Gambia

11.Kingdom of Morocco

12.Republic of Uganda

13. Arab Republic of Egypt

14. People’s Republic of Bangladesh.

 

J. liST OF STATES WHICH HAVE RATIFIED/ACCEDED TO THE FRAMEWORK AGREEMENT ON THE SYSTEM OF TRADE PREFERENCES AMONG OIC MEMBER COUNTRIES:

 

1. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

2. Republic of Turkey

3. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

4. Islamic Republic of Pakistan

5. Islamic Republic of Iran.

6. Republic of Senegal

7. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

 

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REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

CONVENING OF A UNITED NATIONS CONFERENCE TO DEFINE TERRORISM AND DISTINGUISH IT FROM PEOPLES’ STRUGGLE FOR NATIONAL liBERATION

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

1. The Twenty-fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers adopted resolution 53/25-P which it reiterated its support for the convening of an International Conference under the auspices of the United Nations to define terrorism and distinguish it from the peoples’ struggle for national liberation. The Conference invited Member States, in their replies to the U.N. Secretary General on the subject, to stress the need for convening the Conference.

2. The denunciation contained in the resolution of the Twenty-fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers is not limited to the acts of violence and terrorism perpetrated by individuals and groups, but covers also the acts of this nature committed directly or indirectly by States.

3. The Secretary General hopes that the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers will reaffirm the relevant resolution of the Eighth Session of the Islamic Summit Conference and the Resolution of the Twenty-fifth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers urged Member States to exert and coordinate their efforts during the Session of the U.N. General Assembly to permit the convening, as soon as possible, of the International Conference.

4. The Secretary General presents this report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for consideration and appropriate decision.

 

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REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

THE FolLOW UP OF THE CODE OF CONDUCT FOR COMBATING INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

1. The Twenty-second Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers approved, by its Resolution No. 43/22-P, the Code of Conduct for combatting international terrorism. The 7th Islamic summit confirmed this approval by its Resolution No. 43/7-P (IS).

2. The Resolution asked the Secretary General to put on the Agenda of the ICFM an item on the follow up of the Code of Conduct for combatting international terrorism. The Twenty-fifth Session of the ICFM asked the Secretary General to hold a Third Meeting of a Governmental Experts Group to consider the issue of the Follow-up of the Code.

3. The Governmental Expert Group held its meeting in Jeddah from 4 to 6 Rajab 1419H (24-26 October 1998). The Report of this meeting is annexed to this Report (Document No.CCIT/3-98/REP.1 Final).

4. The Secretary General submits the Governmental Expert Group’s report attached to this report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for appropriate decision.

 

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Report of the Third Meeting of the Governmental Group of Experts

On the Follow-up of the Code of Conduct to Combat International Terrorism

Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

(24-26 October 1998)

 

 

I.  The Governmental Group of Experts on Follow-up of the Code of Conduct to Combat International Terrorism held its Third Meeting at the Headquarters of the General Secretariat of the Organization of the Islamic Conference in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, pursuant to Resolution No. 54/25-P adopted by the Twenty-fifth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers, whose Ninth operative paragraph requested the Group to consider a Draft International Convention on Combating International Terrorism, prepared by the General Secretariat on this basis.

II.  Experts from the following Member States participated in the Meeting:

 

  1. Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan
  2. Islamic Republic of Iran
  3. Islamic Republic of Pakistan
  4. People’s Republic of Bangladesh
  5. Burkina Faso
  6. Republic of Turkey
  7. Republic of Tunisia
  8. People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria
  9. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  10. Syrian Arab Republic
  11. Sultanate of Oman
  12. Republic of Guinea
  13. State of Qatar
  14. State of Kuwait
  15. Republic of Lebanon
  16. Socialist People’s libyan Arab Jamahiriy
  17. Malaysia
  18. Arab Republic of Egypt
  19. Kingdom of Morocco
  20. Federal Republic of Nigeria.

 

III.  The Secretary General of the OIC delivered an address in which he welcomed the participating delegations and underscored the importance of the meeting which considers an issue receiving wide-ranging world and Islamic attention. He recalled that the Twenty-fifth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers requested the Group of Experts to examine the Draft Convention on Combating International Terrorism prepared by the General Secretariat on the basis of the Draft Convention already prepared by the Second Meeting of the Group. He stated the principles and ideas on which the Draft Convention prepared by the General Secretariat is based. His Excellency highlighted the necessity of cooperation of OIC Member States to combat international terrorism.

IV.  The Meeting elected as Chairman, His Excellency Ambassador Dr. Mohammed Izzeddine Abdul Moneim, Deputy Assistant of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Arab Republic of Egypt and Head of Delegation.

V.  The Meeting adopted its Draft Agenda.

VI.  The Chairman of the Meeting delivered a statement in which he welcomed the participants and referred to Resolution No. 54/25-P of the 25th ICFM. He drew attention to the necessity of expediting its implementation and consideration of the OIC Draft Convention on Combating International Terrorism, prepared by the General Secretariat based on the framework of the OIC Draft Convention, and in implementation of the task entrusted to the Group in the said Resolution.

VII.  The Meeting discussed in detail all the provisions of the Draft Convention prepared by the General Secretariat which was charged by the 25th ICFM to undertake this task. The Meeting examined the various legal aspects and major contents of the Draft, and concluded that the Draft Convention be submitted to the Twenty-sixth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for consideration and appropriate action thereon.

VIII.  Members of the Group expressed thanks to His Excellency Dr. Azeddine Laraki the OIC Secretary General, and to the Chairman of the Group, His Excellency Ambassador Dr. Mohamed Ez-el-din Abdul Moneim for his wise steering of the deliberations and achieving positive results. They also expressed profound appreciation to His Excellency Ambassador Dr. Sayed Anwar Abu Ali, director of the Department of Legal Affairs, for his contributions to preparing the text of the Draft Convention, as well as to the Members of the Legal Department, the OIC General Secretariat and technical staff.

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REPORT OF THE SECRETARY GENERAL

ON

STRENGTHENING OF ISLAMIC SoliDARITY IN COMBATING HIJACKING

TO THE TWENTY-SIXTH SESSION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS

OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO

28 JUNE – 1 JULY 1999

 

1. This item was placed on the agenda of the Twelfth Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers held in Baghdad in June 1981.

2. The resolution adopted by the Twelfth Islamic Conference expressed deep concern at the increasing incidents of hijacking and at the anguish and suffering caused to innocent passengers and crew involved in such incidents, including injuries and loss of life. The resolution called upon all Member States to carry out their obligations under the Tokyo Convention of 1963, the Hague Convention of 1970 and the Montreal Convention of 1971, regarding penalties for hijacking and guarantees for the safety of civil aviation in the world. The issue has been considered by the subsequent Islamic Conferences of Foreign Ministers which have adopted resolutions on the subject.

3. Successive Islamic Conferences condemned all forms of international terrorism including the crime of hijacking of aircraft and unlawful acts against the safety and security of civil aviation. It called on Member States to refrain from yielding to the demands of hijackers which constitute a form of extortion contrary to the interests of the peoples and countries of the OIC and to established rules. It also called upon Member States to take all necessary measures to curb such crimes and to accelerate the accomplishment of the constitutional procedures and their adherence to the international agreements incriminating such crimes.

4. The Secretary General while bringing the contents of the aforementioned Resolution to the attention of Member States requested them to take due cognizance of its various operative paragraphs in their efforts to strengthen Islamic solidarity in combatting hijacking.

5. The OIC, the United Nations and in particular the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have continued to consider measures for the safety of civil aviation. The Secretary General has continued to follow these efforts made by various other relevant bodies.

6. Despite the adoption of measures to combat hijacking, instances of hijacking are recurring. It is necessary for all Member States to cooperate with each other on this issue, particularly those Member States on whose territories the hijacked plane lands. Such states should exert the utmost efforts to foil the designs of the hijackers in consultation with the country owning the aircraft and to prevent the aircraft from taking off. Member States should also refuse to give in to the blackmail and the demands of the hijackers in order to discourage any further attempts at hijacking. Yielding to such demands encourages further attempts on the part of terrorist groups who carry out hijacking.

7. The International Conventions on the subject, the Hague Convention (1970) and the Montreal Convention (1971) should be ratified and adhered to by Member States to combat such criminal activity.

8. The Secretary General submits this Report to the Twenty-sixth Session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers for appropriate decision.

 

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